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performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> american history tv an c-span2 3. president obama lights the christmas tree. after that a ceremony marking the attack on pearl harbor. >> on thursday president obama and the first family participated in the 90th annual national christmas tree lighting ceremony. the tradition started with prest coolidge. this year's tree is a 23 foot tree. >> merry christmas, everybody. >> it's great to see you all. happy holidays. happy holidays to you mr. president. >> sit time? >> i think it's time. >> for the big button. let's count it down. >> i hope everybody is ready. we've got to do the count do you know. starting the 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> merry christmas everybody. ♪ ♪ >> please welcome director of washington st. john's church. >> let us bow our heads in prayer. let us pray. gracious god who has blessed us with this good land for our heritage, we pray that we may always prove ourselves to be a people mindful of your favor and glad to do your will. we pray that you will s
speaker today is represent as the co-host for today's ceremony for the nationals -- national parks service, mr. robert vogel, superintendent of the national memorial parks. [applause] >> good afternoon. on behalf of the national parks service, it is my pleasure to welcome you to the world war ii memorial, which is dedicated to the valiant soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines who fought in that war. as the superintendent of the national mall and memorial park, i have the true honor of serving as the custodian of this memorial. also ensuring that the story of the brave men and women who fought in world war two is told to the millions of visitors who come here each year. we are very pleased to partner with the friends of the national world war ii memorial in that effort, and i would like to thank general kicklighter for his continued friendship. we at the national parks share in your mission to ensure that the legacy and sacrifice of world war ii veterans are not forgotten. i particularly would like to thank admiral winnefeld for being here today. we appreciate all of your service. incredib
the colorado white national forest. >> good evening, everyone. and welcome to the 48th annual capitol christmas tree lighting ceremony. i am the architect of the capitol and i am honored to serve as your master of ceremonies tonight. for everyone's safety, we ask that you stay in your seat until the conclusion of the program. >> every year, i look forward to this event to officially kick off the holiday season here on capitol hill. and even though the weather doesn't feel like it's december 4, nothing says christmas like the playing of festive holiday carols. i would like to extend a special thank you to the united states air force band under the direction of peter foliard and created this great and festive holiday mood. let's give them a hand, ladies and gentlemen. [applause] >> and behind me stands the u.s. capitol's christmas tree, a majestic 73-foot spruce from colorado's white river national forest. [cheers and applause] >> and in keeping with tradition, the speaker of the house, the honorable john boehner, will extend his holiday greetings to you and officially light this remarkable tree
the national christmas tree. after that, the capital -- capitol christmas tree lighting with john boehner. tomorrow, on washington journal, guests discussed the latest on the so-called fiscal cliff negotiations and the week ahead. a politico reporter looks at the lobbyist involvement in those negotiations. and an update on the situation in syria. live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c- span. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 63, i believe and they are going to say that is president. and indiana -- >> we are talking about facts. when they decided the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish it. they did not say all the states -- >> correct. they talked about indiana. let me finish peeping >> you are misrepresenting. >> no, i am not. >> i hear these accusations that black people, a voter i.d. lost disproportionately affect minorities. it implies to me that we have something missing in our brains. to me, if white americans can get it to vote and go through all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow t
week after the slaughter at sandy hook, 90 minutes after the nation paused in silence on the victims, the national rifle association preparing right now to break its silence. live picture now from washington. that's where they're going to speak. wayne lapierre is going to speak, the head of the nra. we got a warning two minutes ago that it would be two minutes. we're waiting for him to show up. the nra is america's premiere gun rights lobby. it may be facing its biggest challenge in years as many americans shocked, they were shocked by newtown and they're calling for tougher restrictions on guns and ammunition, and while we wait for the group's executive director to appear, wayne lapierre, i want to bring in several of my colleagues now. first off, wolf blitzer is here, jessica yellin is at the white house, dana bash on capitol hill, and jeffrey toobin is in new york for us. as we wait, wolf, let's start with you. is this, in fact, a turning point for guns in america? do you think we'll hear anything like that in this press conference? >> i know a lot of attitudes have hardened as a
governments and now someone is calling to create a nation lottery to pay down the debt. if washington is not coming up with new ideas why not debate it i am cheryl casone and welcome to cash in . we have johnathon and tracey and john . jill joining us. wayne we'll start with you. is it time for a national lottery to pay down the federal debt same time. >> a question why not. if it works with the state governments. why not the federal government and make it a big and huge one and any lttle niche that you can knock down the deficit is good. >> okay, but john, what happens to the states. we are finding out that california is signing up for powerball because of the revenues that they get. ist bad for states. >> it is really bad for states. wayne has much chae of winning the lottery as geth through a comment without johnathon interrupting. >> zero. >> and the problem you have with this. this could be a billion dollar ck mots and huge and going to kill the state lottos and in the stouthern states. they were sold as a way of funding education . that didn't happen. they are dependent on the g
their country. we in the national park service tried every day to repair -- repay and honor the sacrifice of the men and women who served in world war ii by caring for this memorial and by educating our visitors about the importance of world war ii in american history. as the proud son of world war ii veteran, i am honored to be entrusted with this care. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, sir. ladies and gentlemen, it is my honor to introduce the chairman of the board of the friends of the national world war ii memorial, lieutenant-general mckiliter. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us as it -- as we commemorate the 71st anniversary of the attack on pearl harbor and the beginning of world war ii. we want to welcome our distinguished guests today, admiral james winnefeld, our keynote speaker. we are also honored to have with us general px kelly, chairman of the american battle monuments commission who played a role in establishing this special monument. [applause] it is always good to have superintendent bill vogel, our cost for this to work together. also the director o
, but changed enough until it became my own stuff. i want to thank the national book foundation for my award, and recognizing executive director, and his people for keeping this event on track, despite sandy trying to stop us. they deserve our thanks and praise. i have to tell you -- [applause] i have to tell you, i'm energized by this honor. billy thing i've ever wanted to do in my life is have a good time writing stories. this award tells me i'm still at it. thank you. [applause] >> himr. leonard, i'm sitting aa table with walter mosley and he would like you to know that he sat through the big bounce and enjoyed it. he may have been in a marijuana tent, i'm not sure. [laughter] if you haven't ever read elmore leonard's 10 tips for writing, it will take you to second. do it tomorrow, to announce during dinner on your your smartphones. number 10 is my favorite. from elmore leonard, 10 tips for writing, try to leave out the parts that readers tend to skip. [laughter] and that's why that man walked off the stage with a medal. it is time to enjoy your dinner. while you're doing it a want you to
at reagan national, 28 in winchester, 25 in manassas, dulles. we will be in los low 40's this light mixwith a changing over to train. wednesday, a big rain maker into town the day after christmas. you.to >> the maryland state highway administration is keeping an campf the weather possibility of any freezing rain right now. officials are fully stocked with surprise and will deploy equipment as needed. with nearly a third of all americans traveling this meteorologist are about what could be the nightmare after christmas. two new storms are moving in. rob nelson it is on storm watch. >> there is no place like home for the holidays, but the making it easy to get there. rain snow and torrential delayed and stranded many travelers. the road are practically in someble to navigate west.of the >> there are a lot of spin-outs east.r it will be chain controls for the next two days going into christmas. >> women might be the best way to travel if you are trying to sonoma county, california. san francisco international, a 30 flights cancelled and many delays, leading to passengers. >> after i found out
, the nation's financial regulators imposed a huge fine on barclays bank based in the uk for underreporting libor. the global benchmark is used for hundreds of trillions of dollars in transactions. regulators in various countries are also investigating possible involvement of other banks. >>> in japan, financial regulator -- japan's financial regulator, that is, they plan to strengthen rules against insider trading after a series of information leaks from major securities firms earlier this year. the financial services agency now wants stricter punishment for employees at securities firms who illegally leak information to their clients. under current regulations, those employees are not subject to punishment. but after the revision, the agency will reveal names of those involved in serious cases. that's including investors. the agency is also considering a steep rise in penalties. regulators hope to comete a revised bill by the end of the year and submit it to parliament next year. >>> now let's get a check on how markets are performing. tokyo's main stock index broke 9,600 for the first ti
of the national guard of the united states. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. reid: i further ask the bill be read a third time, passed, the motion to reconsider be considered phaeupbd laid on the table, with no intervening or debate and statements related to the measure be printed in the record at the appropriate place as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the committee on commerce be discharged from further consideration of h.r. 4212 and we now proceed to this matter. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: h.r. 4212, an act to prevent the introduction into commerce of unsafe dry wall and so forth and other purposes. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent that the vitter substitute amendment which is at the desk be agreed to, the bill as amended be read a third time and passed, the motions to reconsider be considered made and laid on the table, any statements relating to this matter ap
nation on earth. we have more guns per capita than any country on earth. and after the unfathomable tragedy, our country is united and determined in a demand for change. without change in our gun policy, we cannot expect the outcome to be any different from what we are already experiencing and we have already had too many mass murders and the cost is unbearable. these were elementary schoolchildren. and their teachers. but there have been movie goers. americans going to town hall meetings. there are some who say any gun restriction is an imposition on their liberty. but they must understand that the level of gun violence in america today is an imposition on the liberty of all americans. millions of people. today we call on speaker boehner to work together with us to make america safer by passing a common sense ban on massive massacre sized magazines. thes get the weapons off streets of america. they are not necessary for defense or hunting or sports shooting but they are absolutely deadly when used in a rampage like we saw in connecticut. the bill we propose would limit the size of
a question in the far corner over there. >> yes. i'm with the center for national policy. thank you or the debate. my point here is that there's been suggestion by some of the panelists that once islamists come to power, via ballot box, they won't give up power. and we will have sort of renewed dictatorship types in the middle east. but the events in egypt over the past few weeks suggest that you have a new politicized class of people who are not going to take that. so i agree with one of the previous questioners that in some respects this is quite healthy, that you are going to have these deep debates and divisions within the arab world or the muslim world, and people are not going to accept dictatorships like they had in the past. so i was wondering if the panelists could comment on that? >> if i could say, the point i was trying to stress on the comment on egypt in the report would put out about managing change in egypt, there are these multiple centers of power. they are out in the open. this is an early stage of the game. as rob cited the last presidential election results, the
massachusetts to a cathedral in manhattan to the basilica in washington, d.c. in the nation's capitol president obama held a moment of silence on his own away from the cameras. in a video release this had morning the president spoke to the thousands of american that is signed a we the people petition calling for gun control and vowed to take action. >> as i said earlier this week, i can't do it alone. i need your help. if we're going to succeed it will take a sustained effort for mothers and fathers, daughters and sons, law enforcement and responsible gun owners. >> with the president calling for concrete change by next month, there is already signs of republican resistance to his push for stronger gun control. >> what bothered me the most as a representative is how this has been politicized so quickly. >> do you dare come on my show and say i am using the slaughter of 20 little 6 and 7-year-old children? >> how many children do you have? >> joe, how many children do you have? >> i have four children, tim. answer my question. >> so do i and i refuse to let you say because you have children or a
. i do think that when our nation goes to war, i'm not saying the policymakers, a lot of debate is flippant and there is no resemblance to the reality of these men and women in its one of the reasons i wrote the book. what has happened i have been reporting on stuff for debates. at that point i had never gone to afghanistan and now i've gone twice. when i had gone to iraq as it did want to understand a little bit of what's going on there, but generally speaking we go to war. it's not that we go to war too quickly but we go to war without understanding the nation, without understanding what it means. this little boy who is not going to have a father, that woman who will never get over what happened, these fine incredible young men or women will never be. we think we know it in our hearts but it that it doesn't factor into the intellectual decision i don't think. >> very well put. i was just going to say that i would like to echo just a little bit of that and the separatioseparatio n of the military and the civilian populace is something i talk about at other times so i think that
is not an option with walter dean myers, national ambassador for young people's literature. and director of the library of congress center for the book. this year's international summit was hosted by the library of congress and washington d.c. >> earlier this year walter dean myers was named as the third national ambassador for and people's literature this is a non-profit arm, every child a reader. the notion of the national ambassador would be someone who traveled the country on behalf of young people's literature promoting it and also expanding the audience for reading in every way that we can think of. my proper today you already have . on the table in the back there is a bookmark which has walters photo and also a brief explanation of the national ambassador program. it lasts for two years. walter is midway through his 2-year term speaking on behalf of reading. today we're going to learn a little bit about his experience, but i would like to start by asking him how he chose his particular theme for his activity, which is reading is not optional. walter, do you want to tell us a littl
information moresfrecpark.org. -- >> in this fabulously beautiful persidio national park and near golden gate and running like a scar is this ugly highway. that was built in 1936 at the same time as the bridge and at that time the presidio was an army and they didn't want civilians on their turf. and the road was built high. >> we need access and you have a 70 year-old facility that's inadequate for today's transportation needs. and in addition to that, you have the problem that it wasn't for site extenders. >> the rating for the high viaduct is a higher rating than that collapsed. and it was sapped quite a while before used and it was rusty before installed. >> a state highway through a federal national park connecting an independently managed bridge to city streets. this is a prescription for complication. >> it became clear unless there was one catalyst organization that took it on as a challenge, it wouldn't happen and we did that and for people to advocate. and the project has a structural rating of 2 out of 100. >> you can see the rusting reinforcing in the concrete when you look at the
between national security and education. speakers included former secretary of state condoleezza rice and former chancellor of new york city public-school, joel klein, hosted by the foundation for excellence and education. this is about an hour. >> welcome to this evening's bought test of morning joe. [laughter] the energy in this room is nice. how this issue of educational reform has ripened, the combination of need, the talent we see in this room. there is a sense that the moment has a ride. the other is jeb bush. i am a great believer that two things matter in life -- ideas and people. that is the driver of change in history. jeb is a perfect example of in what he is doing. he is the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. the fact that you are here is the greatest salute you could give. condie and that, the the national security background. we used to mess around with something called the rand bond calculated. it used to calculate the cep, t he circular error robert roe -- error probable. are today. we have travelled a considerable distance. when asked what the gre
in this nation. >> neil: sandra, he seems upset. >> rightly so. he president's proposal right now on the table as john boehner detailed this week, he basically said this is not a serious proposal and here he is asking for more spending, neil, what i find more conflicting, when, since when is the conversation, the natural conversation become nearly-- we raise taxes or else? and it seems like the president is saying that that is the only option on the table and if nothing else happens, it's the republican's fault that we fall off the cliff and go io recession in the new year. >> and you don't believe charlie gasperino or what jay carney says, we could deal with spending cuts up front as well? >> i don't know why anybody is surprised by the opening salvo. i think this is basically it. i don't think that the president's going to budge. i mean, there's a dilutional nature of president obama. he won 50% of the vote and yet, he thinks h won 90% of the vote and that's how he's acting now and i don't care what anybody says, there is no rational reason to raise taxes right now. you don't get enough reve
as they emerge, as a real leading nation is the ability to build bridges, to communicate to build strategic trust and cooperation, to enable every forum, the east asian summit, asian, and others, all bilateral come multilateral relationships in order to keep the volume as well as possible spent last year i had the privilege of interviewing henry kissinger about his book on china. in their there's a chat about strategic trust. i said i can ask kissinger if you still kissinger. so i opened it up and talked about an agreement with henry, and i said i'm going to ask if you're still yourself because you talk about strategic trust. kissinger said i would never write such a thing. i said in a cottage in the book. he said, well then i will defend it. [laughter] now we have had some quick slice of looking at these issues. there's a great article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor je
earned a more formidable reputation as an analytical thinker than harold brown who was the nation's 14th defense secretary during the carter administration. a true prodigy he earned hi doctorate in physics from columbia university when he was just 21. he started his career at livermore lab in california and eventually moving to the pentagon where he became the director of defense research and engineering then air force secretary and eventually defense secretary. his ability to handle a staggering workload are legend including read and annotating 400 page briefing books overnight. during the career brown shaped fighters like the f-15 and f-16 that remain the air force's backbone fleet today. and championed jointness among the military serv before the failed iran hostage rescue mission convinced others to follow. now 85, brown continues to serve on the defense policy board and is a trustee of the center for strategic and international studies. with joyce winds low, brown recently co-authored "star- spangled security" applying lessons safeguarding america. i asked him whether jointness was
nation. >> ok'ing. -- ok. i would like to introduce our host for this evening. very well known as the first asian-american mayor in san francisco history. mayor lee championed balancing the budget to keep san francisco safe, solvents, and successful. he reformed city pensions. his focus is on economic development, job creation, and building san francisco's future. a great job, especially for helping out families. we want to keep families here. i also wanted to mention a little bit of his past. he was born in 1952 in the beacon hill neighborhood of seattle, washington. his parents immigrated to the u.s. from china and the 1930's. his father fought in world war ii and worked as a cook. he passed away when the mayor was 15. his mother was a seamstress and a waitress. mayor lee has five siblings, he graduated from college in maine, he also went to uc- berkeley law school and finished in 1978. he and his wife have two daughters. i also want to mention, prior to becoming mayor, one of the key points in his contributions to the community is after he completed law school, he worked as
as a country because of this massacre and because of the national heartbreak it has caused, to try to get at that very big question, there is a very narrow discussion to be had about a piece of new technology. this is something called a 3d printer. anybody can become a small-scale manufacturer of anything. all you have to do is down load a computer file or create a computer file that has the specifications for the shape of a thing that you would like to build. you do have a limited range of the material that your 3d printer can make something out of, that you have programmed it to make. but you can create a physical, three dimensional object that with something that is the equivalent of a printer. these things cost a few thousand bucks, but it is a relatively straight forward thing. these exists. there are a bunch of different brands of them out there. it's neat. it's also interesting and complicated and maybe quandary inducing when you consider people are starting to build things with 3d printers. one of the things people are already starting to make is a gun. if you think about a gun as
fourth volume on the lbj legacy, and robert caro appeared on q & a and at the national book festival in september. the late anthony shadid has been nominated. he died in syria while covering syria for the washington post. his wife will be here representing him, and that's nada bachary. katherine boo has been nominated, "behind the beautiful forever," about mumbai, and anne applebaum has a book out and is scheduled on our q & a show in september. so we'll be interviewing those authors as we go. we'll be watching the red carpet here as some of the authors have their picture taken. right now we want to talk to the chairman of the national book foundation, and this is david steinberger. mr. steinbergers is also head of the become group what is the national book airport. >> given to the best american books in four categories, fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people's literature, and you look at the people who have won this award, it's the pan of pantheons. saul bell wyoming. >> this began 63 years ago. do you know the history, why it began? >> it was group of people who were interes
by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- live and in hd, this is "good morning washington," on your side. >> straight ahead metro is warning passengers to add an hour to their travel times. >> good morning. happy friday. it is december 7. >> i am steve chenevey. we want to get right to jacqui jeras. >> we did make it to friday finally. the clouds are back. we have even a little bit of moisture out there. some sprinkles can be expected this morning. we will be and this on and off pattern all the way through the weekend into early next week. our temperatures -- some day was the coldest one of the bunch. today will be a little bit warmer. 39 degrees at reagan national. your forecast for today, cloudy with a straight shower, four degrees, cloudy skies and 47 at noon. 51 and mostly cloudy at 5:00. we will show you the weekend forecast. it probably will not be your favorite. that is coming up in just a few minutes. >> it will not be our favorite forecast? as we get up and adam -- at em, the overnight construction has been wrapped up. the beltway passing 650 that is the zone where they had
incident like this. how much do you think national -- the sense of national calamity and heart ache changes what is politically feasible right now? >> i think it changes it dramatically. i just want to point out that this is a gut wrenching tragedy. but every single day, we have 30 people that are murdered by gunfire. countless others that remain wounded, paralyzed by guns. i see it on the front lines in my cities and other cities across america. the urgen sill is there. and now, hopefully, more people are seeing if you don't solve this problem, it's going to continue to pop up around our country. and this is the beauty of it in my opinion. this is almost the elegance of it. that the majority of americans, the majority of gun owners, the overall majority of members agree on sensible gun laws that will make a dramatic difference. 74% of nra members agree with most of us that if you have a criminal conviction, that criminals should not be able to buy guns. and even at higher levels, when you think about the reality, that if you are a suspected terrorist in america, you can go to the secondary
the nuclear disaster in fukushima. and they'll talk about how to defend national security. the official campaign lasts 12 days. voters head to the polls on sunday, december 16th. earlier i spoke with nhk senior commentator masayo nakajima, who has covered countless elections in japan. i asked him what voters are thinking about most. >> voters are thinking first off about whether the democratic party of japan should stay in power. you know, the dpj swept into power in 2009, ending more than half a century of unbroken rule by the leader democrats. its leaders promised a lot as people used to being in opposition often do. they said they would cut government spending. they said they would stop the construction of a multimillion-dollar dam, make expressways toll free. prime minister noda had to come out last month to apologize for all the broken promises. support for his party slumped under his watch. the dpj offered a confused response to the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis. noda oversaw the restart of nuclear reactors, and he embraced unpopular causes such as the hike in the consum
the poachers out and to begin the construction of roads. the first federal superintendent of sequoia national park was colonel charles young. he happened to be the third african-american to graduate from west point. he went on to become the first black colonel in the army. amazing story. i believe he'll be honored sometime later this year by some sort of a national monument at his home in ohio. so, pretty interesting fellow and pretty amazing leadership demonstrated. today our rangers across the country perform modern-day public services, often away from municipalities. so, we're the only game in town at yosemite. we perform search and rescue police, emergency services, medical, even corner duties. closer to home, we have urban [speaker not understood] here in san francisco and at the national mall. so, we have a sprat strong cadre of rangers that help in incident managements, presidential visits, americas cup here, most recently helping with the city and the coast guard and even katrina and the gulf war spill most recently. closer to home the golden gate bridge connects not only our park lan
round of a national referendum on the countries' disputed new constitution is set to start on saturday morning. most observers expect the constitution to be approved. unofficial results from the first round of voting last week showed 57% in favor of the document. >> critics say the constitution is to islamist-based and ignores the rights of women and minorities in the country. in the run-up to the vote, opponents and supporters of morsi clashed again on friday. >> "our souls and our blood we sacrifice to islam," they chanted in alexandria. thousands of muslim brotherhood supporters rallied in the city ahead of the voting on egypt's referendum on the proposed constitution. >> my message to the egyptian people is saying yes to stability. production needs to start moving. economic reform will jump-start political reform, not the other way around. >> opponents of the constitution were also out in force. police tried to keep the two groups apart but were unable to prevent clashes. reports say at least 30 people were injured. with the country so divided over the proposed constitution, the go
the nation today worshipers prayed for the victims of the connecticut massacre and tried to find comfort. cbs4 spoke with parishioners at st. mary's cathedral in san francisco. >> it's times like tease that our faith becomes apparent. the important thing is not to lose hope. >> reporter: people with heavy hearts came to st. mary's cathedral for comfort and community. >> my heart is full of sorrow, and i'm here for my family to hug my children and be blessed. >> reporter: the church put up a memorial to the people that died in connecticut with white ribbons and a prayer for their souls. >> our hearts are all torn. >> how can anybody really hurt kids? >> the church has a book where you can write and register your prayers. there are a lot of words. >> we are going to now join cbs's special report. the president is about to speak in sandy hook. >> thank you, governor. to all of the families, first responders, to the community of newtown, clergy, guests. scripture tells us, do not lose heart. though outwardly we are wasting away, inwardly we are being renewed day by day. for light and momentarily
of his system of natural liberty which is what he called it in the wealth of nations, i was able to actually tell a story. this book is actually a story that has a plot, hal adams smith and his system of natural liberty are treated overtime, how they come under attack by the marxist, the dublins, the keynesian sense someone, but have they are resurrected, brought back to life and even improved upon by the other schools of economics, the austrian school, chicago school of economics, and friedman and so forth. it's really a unique -- i think have done something really unique. and make a real story with a heroic figure who triumphs in the end. a true american story. the model i see as the ideal. >> who was ludwig? >> the premier austrian economist of the 20th-century. he taught initially at the university of vienna. he was jewish. city left turn or to permit him to america , and his economics became more popular never as popular as milton friedman, but certainly a heroic figure in my book. one of his students -- close associates won the nobel prize in economics in 1974. so he is an
. michigan becomes the 24th state in the nation to ratify a aw that protects workers from being forced to pay union dues as a condition of their employment. we'll be examining tonight what's happening in michigan and in washington, d.c. with the author of "shadow bosses: how government. employee unions control america and rob taxpayers blind." mallory factor joins us. also tonight, egypt's president, muhammad morsi, ordering the egyptian military to arrest people in the street even as he claimed to have rescinded the dictatorial powers he assumed which have spurred violent demonstrations. and a new intelligence report concludes that america's time as the lone superpower is nearing an end. former director of national intelligence john negro panty joins us to talk about our future as a superpower and the challenges that we'll surely face. we begin tonight with one of the few scheduling misadventures of president obama's swire tenure in -- entire tenure in office. the president speaking to autoworkers outside detroit today, a day before governor snyder will sign michigan's newly-passed ri
nation still mourns. and i wanted to take a moment of silence for newtown, connecticut. if you'd join me, please. \[moment of silence] >> thank you. i will tell you that this is an exciting day for many, many reasons, but for me, the first thing i wanted to say is just thank you to my lord and savior, jesus christ, to be honest with you. \[applause] i believe that when you start out in a single-parent household with a mom who works 16 hours a day and you're looking at a future that doesn't look as bright and you're living in north charleston, south carolina, you build a strength that comes from ching the appreciation and understanding that is not about you, it's about your faith, it's about your family. and i love my mother, who's here with me, frances scott, and i'm very thankful to the good lord and to a strong mom who believes that sometimes love has to come at the end of a switch, and she loves me a lot. and i'll tell you that along that way, that when times got tough and when i was flunking out of high school -- when i failed world geography, civics, spanish and english -- when you
or less. >>> it's a big night at the white house. the national christmas tree lighting ceremony is underway on the ellipse. the first family is set to flip the switch in a few minutes. the tradition is meant to celebrate the holiday season and share the message of peace. the u.s. navy band, i think, just wrapping up here. sue palka is on the ellips tonight and, sue, normally, i would be asking you about the cold when you're outside like. this you have a celebration to talk about. >> reporter: we have a wonderful celebration already underway down here and i have to actual, the first family hasn't arrived yet. we can see the white house and the limos hind up. they apparently will be here in about 15 minutes, so we will be bringing you the tree lighting live when that happens. obviously, nothing it is going to happen until they get here, until fantastic entertainment already. behind me, we have the united states navy commodore band playing there, wonderful, and we had some entertainment since 4:30. weather is fantastic, sorry i have to bring up my own. i am so delighted that it's n
the first family down on the ellipse for the lighting of the national christmas tree. they should be getting there any minute now. we will take you there live. doug kammerer is down there. also ahead, traffic backed up for miles on the beltway this morning. what happened with a fruit truck that caused problems for so many drivers. >>> the duchess of cambridge out of the hospital after a battle with severe morning sickness. now she's getting an apology. >>> attacks on animals at a woman's farm. what >>> a close watch on what's happening down at the ellipse, where they're getting ready to light the national christmas tree. not going to be any moment, though. we will take you live there when it's just about to happen. we hope you'll stay tuned for that. >>> now to a mystery in gaithersburg. owners of a farm there say something has been killing their sheep. derrick ward reports now there's growing concern that the animal attacks could start to move up the food chain. >> reporter: the aftermath of the attacks in gaithersburg, the bodies covered by tarp. the killing had been silent, and efficient.
, and the nation searching for answers. >> the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. >> we'll have live reports from the scene with the latest on the investigation and the victims. we'll talk with police, parents of some of the children who attend the school. and with the state's long-time senator joe lieberman. >> then will there be a new push on capitol hill for cuffer gun control? we hear the same calls after every mass shooting. but will the horrific nature of this crime change the debate? we'll ask democratic senator dick durbin and republican congressman lieu ego merit. we'll also look at what we can do better to protect our children when we talk with ronald stevens, one of the nation's top experts on school safety. >> chris: and our sunday panel weighs in on a crime of mass violence that is becoming much too familiar. >> our special school tragedy coverage begins right now on "fox news sunday." and hello again from fox news in washington. our hearts are broken. that's how president obama responded friday to the slaug
so far, the president plans to keep pressuring republicans from the outside. meeting with the nation's governors on tuesday and then addressing the business roundtable on wednesday. lou: thank you. ed henry, fox news chief white house correspondent. joining me now, a pulitzer prize-winning journalist, campaign strategists, former reagan political director of, veteran democratic campaign strategists. we thank you all for being here. let's turn, if i may, to you. this is an impasse, a stal i'm going to be the one who raises taxes, but you're going to be the ones to cut medicare. if you want cuts in entitlements, but the mob. i'm not going to do both for you. lou: here is a thought. that is, th obama white house has made a rare mistake, miscalculation. they have incentivized republicans to say, you know, the heck with it. if you're not going to come to the table, we are not going to advance it. you have chosen and we have reached an agreement as to parties for squestration. we will go along with the tax cuts. that's your decision. sequestration was part -- we are partners on that deal.
shooting are laid to rest and a nation grieves with this small town. >>> plus the investigation, new details about the shooter, his mother, and his weapons as those who knew him come forward. >> she asked me to always keep an eye on him and never turn my back on him. >> and president obama declares. >> these tragedies must end. >> asking alamerican if we are doing enough to keep our children safe. but is washington doing enough? >> from the global resources of abc news, this is a special edition of "nightline," tragedy at sandy hook, the search for solutions. >> i'm cynthia mcfadden. today the first of far too many funerals in a small community changed by tragedy. three days ago 20 children and six adults were killed in a connecticut elementary school, a mass shooting that sent shock waves of degree across the country. abc's juju chang reports from newtown, connecticut. >> reporter: sandy hook elementary school is closed tomorrow. and when the children return it will be to a different campus. the town is covered with memorials like this one that take on a feeling of a sacred sight as
want to start with politics. you spent so much time in the nation's past. there is a lot at stake. the reluctance on the part of the leaders to say the american people. >> a lot of it is for the last 30 years we changed the dialogue from not my version of government is better than yours to the belief government isn't right. the person who believes the government is a workable instrument as to fight to a resistant to that. during the depression and the dust bowl during the second world war and other periods we have had a sense of shared sacrifice to get things done that democracy is the politics of the half love. not everybody gets everything. when we realize we are going to have to give it up it is given up in the back roomgz i think this take no prisoners my way or the highway attitude shows an incredible lack of the awareness of what it means to govern in the united states. >> and what government should do to help people particularly in a distressed economy and what the limits are before you infringe on personal freedom. >> that's right. every decade has an example of it. we hav
the first flag of this nation, of this land, the eagle staff larry harristan. how about a round of applause for larry? thank you larry. bringing in our dancers. (drums). good to see you. our southern and northern dancers. welcome ladies. welcome. followed by our jingle "dancing with dancers. welcoming our dancers as well. our northern traditional dancers followed by our grass dancers. how about a big round for applause for all ours dancers? good to see you. (drums). going over to our group over here. flag song. please. long before the national anthem composed by francis scott key the 50 people that this land. >> >> the first people that this land had these fight songs, national anthems for these tribes, paying homage to the first flag of this land, the eagle staff. remembering our veterans as well, the warriors whether going to battle or returning from battle paying homage to their service, paying homage to this flag. always honored our veterans, our warriors. (chanting) (spiritual chanting). remember our fallen veterans and those still in battle. going into a victory song.
that is in fact a national security threat. we are no longer going to be able to pay almost half the world's entire military budget. we should start by rejecting this authorization. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from utah. mr. bishop: it i always hate to try to say we ought to learn lessons of history, but the founding fathers when they made this our core constitutional responsibility clearly understood if you do not have a military capacity, you do not have not only the ability to defend the country, but you do not have the ability to make diplomatic efforts in those areas. it is interesting that many of our allies in nato are spending far more of their g.d.p. on military defense than we are, but obviously, and ironically, those who are are almost always those countries which experience firsthand what it was like to live under the domination of the soviet union. they understand the significance of this particular proposal and these particular dinds of -- kinds of bills. i would like at this time to recognize the retiring chairman of the rules com
and gloves this morning. under clear skies. 35 at national. that's one of the warm e spots. 43 by -- warmer spots. 43 by noon. we'll have a sunny day. maybe passing clouds this afternoon with temperatures topping out in the mid-40s, 46, perhaps 47. a lot colder. winds turning to the southeast but they'll be light today at about 5 miles an hour. we have a little bit after breeze right along the bay in some of the exposed areas but most areas have light winds. clear skies thanks to the clouds that have come and gone overnight. they're out of here. so with the clear skies and light winds, we have cold. luray is 27 this morning. off to the east it's 28 even at andrews. south of town we have just over freezing. 34 in the fredricksburg area and only going into the mid- 40s. you'll want to bundle up and grab the sunglasses. it's 6:00 straight up. monika samtani talking pineapples and other issues. >> you're right. they've all been on major thoroughfares unfortunately this morning. i'll start off with the overturned truck we've been telling you about since early this morning. in fact, this happened
with disabilities act can we step forward at the nation. with their fear and concern? i can recall going to greene county in rural illinois and marketing to carrollton and the city hall and they said, does this mean we have to build a new restroom for the disabled quakes the answer was yes and curb cuts and other changes that seem so superficial to many, but bitterly whether or not a disabled person can be part of america. what we did 22 years ago was really novel because if you look at the course of american history, i think we have distinguished ourselves in successive generations by expanding the reach of freedom and opportunity. think how many times who do not. if you go back to the earliest days of this great nation with older white men sat together and decided who would rule america, they were thinking about those of color. they were thinking about women. they were thinking about the disabled and they sure weren't thinking about those who work property owners. it was an elite group that would form our quote democracy. then suggested generations of americans decided if democracy went anything
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